History of Bottling Works in Orangeville

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Alexander Speers Walker was fondly known as Alexander “Pops” Walker due to his involvement in Orangeville’s bottling business. He started Walker & Co. making unfermented wines and aerated waters in the basement of his home, and after acquiring Orangeville Bottling Works from James Crozier, he expanded to make ginger ale, lemon sour, cream soda, birch beer and more. The name was changed to Walkers Beverages, but some drinks were still bottled under the Orangeville Bottling Works brand.


The biggest seller was Coca-Cola, which was franchised in 1927. By the 1960s, it accounted for 90% of production with the remaining 10% for the Bottling Works own line of flavours. The company also had a contract to supply single drink bottles to the 164th Battalion canteen at Camp Borden. As business thrived production moved from Mill St. to a larger plant at Fourth Ave and Third St, which was known as the Coca-Cola Bottling Plant.


The company remained at this location until the early 1990s when it was demolished. After Walker retired his son-in-law, Willis Richardson, took over and later Richardson’s son-in-law, David McCleary.


Alexander Speers Walker was fondly known as Alexander “Pops” Walker due to his involvement in Orangeville’s bottling business. He started Walker & Co. making unfermented wines and aerated waters in the basement of his home, and after acquiring Orangeville Bottling Works from James Crozier, he expanded to make ginger ale, lemon sour, cream soda, birch beer and more. The name was changed to Walkers Beverages, but some drinks were still bottled under the Orangeville Bottling Works brand.


The biggest seller was Coca-Cola, which was franchised in 1927. By the 1960s, it accounted for 90% of production with the remaining 10% for the Bottling Works own line of flavours. The company also had a contract to supply single drink bottles to the 164th Battalion canteen at Camp Borden. As business thrived production moved from Mill St. to a larger plant at Fourth Ave and Third St, which was known as the Coca-Cola Bottling Plant.


The company remained at this location until the early 1990s when it was demolished. After Walker retired his son-in-law, Willis Richardson, took over and later Richardson’s son-in-law, David McCleary.

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Page last updated: 25 June 2021, 18:18